How I Found Hope Through Golden Girls Fashion

Every handmade item has a story to tell. Well, this shirt has two. The first is of a blogger who’s found her online people. The second is about her actual community–you know, the face-to-face kind. It all started last month, when I decided to take part in my very first linky party. You bloggers out there know what I’m talking about: Some enterprising soul announces a topic and asks others to explore it, too. Fellow bloggers publish their own posts, then the organizer collects their links and features them on a special page.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI Try My Very First Linky Party

Linky parties are a brilliant way to make connections. But to a new blogger like me, they can feel a tad daunting. In my case, inspiration overtook hesitation when I came across Sew the Show from Alida Makes. Each month, Alida (a.k.a., Miss Modern Sewing, Southern Twang) asked readers to “put that Netflix addition to good use” by sewing fashion inspired by her selected TV show. Alida’s Friends linky party turned out to be the one that hooked me in. As it happened, writing the post lit me up. Then as I watched the fellow entries roll in, I knew I’d found my tribe. So when Alida announced this month’s show as The Golden Girls, I felt a pang of disappointment. “How could I possibly find inspiration from clothing Sophia or Rose wore,” I wondered? Also, it sounded awfully close to Gilmore Girls, the show I’d been secretly rooting for. I loved the show, though, so I googled “Golden Girls fashion” anyway. (Are you trying to tell me you’ve never done this yourself? Okay, I’ll let it slide.) That’s when I saw this shot of Dorothy. I’d been considering making a wrap top, and something about the print indicated it could be modernized. Suddenly this linky party was starting to seem doable after all. dorothy

I Learn the Word Chemono (and Decide to Make One, Pronto)

Several days passed and I embarked on another internet search. This time, I sought ways to comfort a friend, my 30-something buddy who’d be having surgery soon. An elective double mastectomy, to be exact. In other words, she didn’t have cancer, but genetic testing had revealed a high risk. After losing her mother to the disease, then experiencing her 21-year-old sister’s bout with it, my friend chose a proactive path. A variety of sites shared tips for how to show support, such as this one featuring a chemo survival kit. Its kimono wrap caught my instant attention. Though chemo wasn’t part of my friend’s treatment plan, I figured a top like this could be handy for tending to wounds. Another site even named this kind of shirt, now on my to-make list, a chemono. (Well played, internet. Well played.) And so the search began. The first step was to scour Pinterest for patterns. This proved trickier than I thought, but eventually I found this: Maternity Top to Wrap Tee. As usual, I hit the thrift store next. I set out with a plan to find two coordinating t-shirts. They had to be soft and cozy, made of natural fibers, and large enough for room to breathe. My girlfriend’s partial to prints, and I scouted for her colors (teals, purples, other happy hues).

The following weekend, the real work began. The cutting. The measuring. The pattern interpreting. The belief. The uncertainty. The learning. Oh, the learning! Wow, there’s a lot about sewing you must do before you know. Listen up, amateur sewists: Making bias tape from jersey is not a good idea. Yes, I did it here, but I won’t try it again. To get it right, I had to add apparel interfacing.

Fast forward two days and about ten hours, and I’d created a shirt I could be proud of. At least it matched the vision in my mind. It was soft and pretty-like, and most of all, it’d provide access to places my friend would need as she healed.

Yes, I’d made a shirt that allowed me to say the things I might not be able to, out loud.

  • If I could use my own two hands to make it all better, I would. But here’s something they can do instead, and I hope it might suffice.
  • You, yes you, are a reason I made it through my divorce. Do you know I still cry a little each time I think of that day? You know the one. I couldn’t get out of bed. But there you were, with that giant paper bag of soup. And bread. And sandwiches. And hope.
  • I hate that you have to go through this. Lord knows I’ve seen your strength before, but I’d be okay if you didn’t have to use it for a while, you know?
  • God, I can’t replace your mom. I searched for something soft to the touch, something that might comfort you when it hurts. And she’s still a part of you–I know you know–breathing through your love of culture, your devotion to church, your joy in education.
  • Feel better, my friend. By all means, feel better.
  • Last of all–dare I say it?–thank you for being a friend.

28 thoughts on “How I Found Hope Through Golden Girls Fashion

  1. What an inspiring post! You are creating something so personal and comforting for your friend. She is making brave choices and you are supporting her all the way. The top looks pretty and cheerful on you. I understand about that whole ‘that day’ of divorce. Many of us can relate to the devastation. How wonderful that we can be there as women friends to support each other through the trials of life. Best wishes to your friend for a speedy recovery!
    Thanks so much for sharing this with our Lifestyle Linkup today (I’m hosting with Jennifer:).
    Cheers, Heather @ Stylemindchic Life

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  2. You are such a WONDERFUL FRIEND! Your compassionate thoughts will hug her forever! Oh, What a beautiful gift for her that whenever she wears it she will think of you. Prayers for your friend and for you too.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. That was an incredible gift. I may be slightly more sensitive right now, but that is the type of thoughtfulness that makes a real friend.

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    1. Thanks, Miss Southern Twang herself! (I feel I can get away with adding the Miss before your name, as I grew up in Texas.) So sweet to hear your support. When she’s no longer looped up on narcotics, I can’t wait to fill her in on all her encouragers.

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